Mortlake Project

 

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex (MSVC) and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.

There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.

However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.

In March 2015, an Induced Polarisation (IP) survey was conducted at the Chamallak Prospect to traverse the anomalous magnetic features in the MSVC which display a unique signature not to be associated with neighbouring anomalies of the Newer Volcanics present in the area. Two lines of 100m spaced dipole-dipole IP were acquired across three moderately east dipping and south plunging magnetic sources. An anomalous chargeability response was identified in the northern line, approximately 500m east of the north-eastern-most magnetic source.

The chargeability feature is interpreted as possibly reflecting disseminated pyrite associated with retrograde phyllic alteration (silica, sericite, pyrite) overprinting earlier prograde potassic/ propylitic alteration. At Thursday’s Gossan deep diamond drilling has shown there to be an excellent correlation between IP chargeability features and phyllic alteration.

A diamond drill hole is planned at the Chamallak prospect to target porphyry intrusion related copper-gold or VMS-style base metals / gold mineralisation and to provide stratigraphic information. The target comprises a magnetic high with a proximal induced polarisation chargeability feature within the prospective Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex.

The proposed programme has the potential to discover porphyry copper-gold mineralisation or VMS base metals / gold mineralisation in an under-explored terrain. The drill holes will be designed to test the IP chargeability feature.

 

Mort mag_ZM_ 06 12 15MortLine 03 12 15

 

Mortlake Project

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.

There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.

However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.

Planned Exploration

Stavely Minerals intends to conduct test lines of Induced Polarisation (IP) geophysics across the distinctive magnetic features to assess if there are any chargeability responses which could potentially be reflecting disseminated sulphides at depth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortlake Project

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.

There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.

However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.

Planned Exploration

Stavely Minerals intends to conduct test lines of Induced Polarisation (IP) geophysics across the distinctive magnetic features to assess if there are any chargeability responses which could potentially be reflecting disseminated sulphides at depth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.

 

 

There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.

However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.

Planned Exploration

 

Stavely Minerals intends to conduct test lines of Induced Polarisation (IP) geophysics across the distinctive magnetic features to assess if there are any chargeability responses which could potentially be reflecting disseminated sulphides at depth.

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.
There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.
However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.
Planned Exploration

Stavely Minerals intends to conduct test lines of Induced Polarisation (IP) geophysics across the distinctive magnetic features to assess if there are any chargeability responses which could potentially be reflecting disseminated sulphides at depth.

The Mortlake Project straddles the boundary between the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens but is covered predominantly by late Cainozoic basalt of the Western District Province as well as younger Quaternary sediments. The Moyston Fault dividing the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens is inferred to pass through the Mortlake Project. Its position is approximated by the Mortlake Discontinuity where a distinct change in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Cainozoic basalts is believed to indicate a change in the underlying Palaeozoic basement rocks. The tenement is therefore potentially underlain by both the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex and Moornambool Metamorphic Complex.

 

 

There are no known mineral occurrences within the Mortlake Project and it has seen very little exploration activity because of the obscuring basalt cover.

However the basalt cover is generally very thin (<10 m) and Stavely Minerals has identified a series of distinctive magnetic features believed to be remnants of the Stavely Volcanic Belt preserved below the young, shallow basalt cover of the Newer Volcanics. The magnetic features are different in character to the smaller volcanoes and scoria cones associated with the Newer Volcanics.

Planned Exploration

 

Stavely Minerals intends to conduct test lines of Induced Polarisation (IP) geophysics across the distinctive magnetic features to assess if there are any chargeability responses which could potentially be reflecting disseminated sulphides at depth.